More About the FOUNDATION and Community center


About the Sleepy Hollow Charitable Foundation

The Sleepy Hollow Charitable Foundation (SHCF) is dedicated to the safety and well-being of residents, the environment of Sleepy Hollow, and other charitable and public benefit activities. 

SHCF was incorporated in California in November 2012, and received tax-deductible charitable status from the U.S. IRS on March 13, 2013. Its directors are Sleepy Hollow residents, some of whom are also directors of the SHHA. Current directors are Spencer Adams, Luke Argilla, Jan Blackford, Lorraine Ferrarese, John Grubb, Scott Hintergardt, Bradley Johnson, Pete Mayer, Ryan Nail, and Shaun Westfall.

SHCF and the Sleepy Hollow Homes Association (SHHA) are separate organizations which share the goal to build the new Community Center.  Some organizational details:

  • SHCF operates the facilities at 1317 Butterfield Road via a 30-year lease from the SHHA, is the borrower of the debt to build the new center, contracts to build the center, and receives all payments of rents, leases, and use agreements. It will operate the building as landlord and for its charitable purposes, including fire safety, senior activities, fitness, and education.
  • SHHA owns the land at 1317 Butterfield Road, and has leased to the SHCF the right and responsibility to build and operate the new center for 30 years. At the end of the lease, ownership of all facilities at 1317 Butterfield Road reverts to the SHHA. SHHA guarantees the debts of the SHCF and leases from the SHCF space and use to carry out all missions of the SHHA for the Sleepy Hollow community, including the family swim program.


Design and Benefits of 

Community Center Renovation


New lifespan for a jewel of our community. Built to the highest safety, accessibility, and environmental standards, the Community Center will encourage a broad range of activities and events of interest to our residents of all ages.

  • High safety construction with emergency power and communication, a refuge in times when we might suffer power outages, be affected by natural disasters, isolated by earthquake, or need shelter for temporary, partial evacuations.
  • Accessible to all, and all on one level. Preserving the original slab and much of the structure including the exposed beams and fireplace in the Founders Room.
  • Preservation of the grand space we have now for traditional gatherings and events, with added flexibility to divide the two parts of the larger space, described in drawings as the Founders Room and Legends Room, to accommodate simultaneous activity or to control heating costs.
  • Home for the SHFPD in permanent offices and storage space, use of meeting/classroom space as needed for its educational mission: increasing awareness of fire risk, preparedness that can save our property and or lives, and readiness to act safely in an actual emergency, including evacuation. All parts of the building are convertible for emergency use by the community and first responders.
  • A new entry on the south side of the building behind an entry gate provides security for the site and allows for a one-way, two lane drive through with safe pick up and drop off area and one accessible parking space. Safe access separate from vehicles is provided for children and parents, by car, bike, or walking.
  • Enclosure of the old “front porch” creates a beautiful scene from Butterfield, a cozy retreat for small conversations or quiet reading. The Porch or Library offers an alternate entry into the building and connection to the Founders Room with its big fireplace and larger gathering area.
  • Space is flexible, to be adapted as community needs change, meeting requirements of the SHFPD and the needs of our residents of all ages and a wide range of interests.
  • No more burglar-barred doors. Instead, an active center built and run by the community with a small office for an onsite manager / activities director as needed.
  • Some increase in rentals for mid-sized gatherings may be possible because of its new quality. However, outside rental income is not a significant factor in planned operations.
  • Operating efficiencies and up to date State and County code compliance with green building, energy, accessibility, and safety codes. Features include insulation, glazing, LED lighting, zoned heating, fire alarm and sprinkler system, emergency lighting, improved drainage, seismic upgrades, FireWise landscaping, and more.

A treasure for us now, support for our property values, and appeal to a new and future generation of families considering a home in Sleepy Hollow. That’s our new Community Center, Phase 1 2020. Phase 2 will continue with renovation of the bathroom locker rooms, new outdoor showers, and more.

In the plans and drawings (www.shha.org/communitycenter), you can visualize children enjoying our own “pocket park,” adults and teens stopping in to meet friends, watch a movie or sports event, play games. You might hear interesting speakers, music and dance performances, choir practice, children’s story hours, maybe teen band nights. You could be in tutoring, exercise, or other classes of interest without having to leave the Hollow. You and your family and friends can enjoy neighborhood celebrations and planned and informal gatherings.

How do you see yourself at the Community Center? What activities will benefit you? Whether you are a senior or empty nester, teen or middle schooler, parent of young children (or teens or middle schoolers), commute to an office or work from home, email shhapresident@gmail.com and tell us what you want to do at the Sleepy Hollow Community Center.

Donate or pledge now.  Pledge and schedule donations, donate now by credit/debit card or PayPal account, and see the Donor Giving Guide with instructions for other ways to give, including gifts of securities, wire transfers, and donations from an IRA.

For more on the history of the Community Center, from the 1950s and rebuild efforts that began in 2013, visit History of the Community Center and Rebuild Efforts.


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